About

The University of Oklahoma group for Boundary Layer Integrated Sensing and Simulation (OU-BLISS) is a team of faculty and researchers with an interest in multi-faceted studies of the boundary layer. Through a variety of instrumentation and simulations, we seek to understand the dynamic nature of the lowest level of the atmosphere.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions!

The BLISS Doppler Lidar is currently deployed for VORTEX-SE as part of the CLAMPS platform. Data plots coming soon!

Perdigão

Perdigão

Members of the OU-BLISS team went international with a minature version of CLAMPS to measure wind flow over complex terrain as part of the Perdigão Project in Portugal. Learn more »

PECAN

PECAN: Plains Elevated Convection At Night

OU-BLISS members participated in this large, intensive field project operating the CLAMPS platform to collect data before and during nighttime thunderstorms. Learn more »

LABLE

LABLE: Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

An on-going study by the OU-BLISS team in collaboration with the ARM Southern Great Plains research facility. Learn more »

People

Current Group Members

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Dr. Petra Klein

Professor
School of Meteorology

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Dr. Evgeni Fedorovich

Professor
School of Meteorology

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Dr. Alan Shapiro

Professor
School of Meteorology

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Dr. Phillip Chilson

Professor
School of Meteorology

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Matt Carney

Instrumentation Tech
School of Meteorology

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Elizabeth Smith

Ph.D. Student
School of Meteorology

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Josh Gebauer

Ph.D. Student
School of Meteorology

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Tyler Bell

Ph.D. Student
School of Meteorology

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Previous Group Members and Collaborators

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Dr. Dave Turner

Scientist
Earth System Research Laboratory

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Dr. Jeremy Gibbs

Research Asst. Professor
University of Utah

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Dr. Jennifer Newman

Senior Research Associate
REsurety, Inc.

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Dr. Tim Bonin

Postdoctoral Research Associate

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Dr. Greg Blumberg

Alumnus
School of Meteorology

Seminars

Boundary Layer, Urban Meteorology, and Land-Surface Processes Seminar | Fridays | 2:00 PM | Room 5600

The BLISS group runs a seminar series within the School of Meteorology. The series is currently convened by Dr. Petra Klein and Elizabeth Smith. A list of previous seminars delivered in the Boundary-Layer, Urban-Meteorology and Land-Surface Processes Seminar Series is availible here.

Next Seminar | 16 Nov. 2018 | 2:00 PM | Room 5600

Assimilation of Boundary Layer Profilers: Implications for the Prediction of Nocturnal Convection Initiation and Atmospheric Bores

Hristo Chipilski and Samuel Degelia - School of Meteorology

Recent upgrades to observational networks such as Doppler radars and satellites have greatly enhanced the warning and forecasting capabilities of national weather services across the world. Although the addition of such datasets has also considerably increased the forecast skill of numerical weather prediction models, the meteorological community continues to insist on the need for more adequate observations in and above the boundary layer (BL). The impact of insufficient observations in the lower troposphere is magnified at night, as many convective processes occur above the surface inversion. Technological advances in remote sensing have given rise to novel BL profilers that could potentially close the existing observation gap. The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) project provides a novel observation set that includes, among others, high-frequency thermodynamic and kinematic profilers. This study outlines the main lessons learnt in the process of assimilating various PECAN BL instruments in a high-resolution GSI-based ensemble data assimilation and forecasting system.

Results are discussed separately in the context of a 26 June 2015 case study, which features a large nocturnal CI event initiated along the terminus of a nocturnal low-level jet, and a 6 July 2015 case study, which features a large nocturnal MCS maintained by a convectively-generated bore. Firstly, the experimental design and data availability for the presented case studies are described, with a special emphasis on how the location of the assimilated profilers is relevant for improving the respective events. In addition, we outline key aspects of the observation pre-processing and error treatment in the context of the GSI system. The second part of the talk makes use of ensemble forecast results to highlight the relative merits of assimilating each novel instrument type. We particularly focus on how the BL profilers modify the thermodynamic and kinematic environment in the model. In view of the topics discussed throughout the talk, key recommendations for the operational incorporation of BL profilers in future observation networks are provided.

Seminar Schedule

16 Nov. - Hristo Chipilski and Sam Degila

26 Nov. - Elizabeth Smith: Doctoral Defense 2:30pm NWC1350

Publications